Dating of ramayana

Since its introduction to the Thai people, the Ramakien has become a firm component of the culture.

The Ramakien of Rama I is considered one of the masterpieces of Thai literature.

The epic, traditionally ascribed to the Hindu sage Valmiki, narrates the life of Rama, the legendary prince of the Kosala Kingdom.

It follows his banishment from the kingdom by his father King Dasharatha, his travels across forests in India with his wife Sita and brother Lakshmana, the kidnapping of his wife by Ravana, the demon king of Lanka, resulting in a war with him, and Rama's eventual return to Ayodhya to be crowned king.

The history of the legends was told in the shade theater (Thai: หนัง, Nang), a shadow-puppet show in a style adopted from Indonesia, in which the characters were portrayed by leather dolls manipulated to cast shadows on a nearby screen while the spectators watched from the other side.

The Ramayana, holy revered text of Hindus, is believed by many archaeologists and historians to be a collection of stories from Hindu mythology concentrating on the work of the gods in the lives of men, and was first written down, as legend states, in the forests of India by Valmiki Nevertheless, the Ramayana came to Southeast Asia by means of Indian traders and scholars who traded with the Khmer kingdoms (such as Funan and Angkor) and Srivijaya, with whom the Indians shared close economic and cultural ties.In the late first millennium, the epic was adopted by the Thai people.The oldest recordings of the early Sukhothai kingdom, dating from the thirteenth century, include stories from the Ramayana legends.It is still read, and is taught in the country's schools.In 1989, Satyavrat Shastri translated the Ramakien into a Sanskrit epic poem (mahakavya) named Ramakirtimahakavyam, in 25 sargas (cantos) and about 1200 stanzas in 14 metres.

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